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Martha Lillard needed a large respirator called an iron lung to recover from polio, which she caught in 1953. She still uses a form of the device at nights. Courtesy of Martha Lillard hide caption

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Courtesy of Martha Lillard

Decades after polio, Martha is among the last to still rely on an iron lung to breathe

Martha Lillard had just turned 5 years old when polio incapacitated her. She still uses a form of the ventilator that saved her life as a child — though now she worries about replacement parts.

Ed Sheeran pictured at the 68th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin in Berlin, Germany in February 2018 in Berlin, Germany. The singer announced he tested positive for COVID-19 just days ahead of the release of his fourth album. Thomas Niedermueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Niedermueller/Getty Images

Ed Sheeran has COVID-19, which may mean he won't perform on 'SNL' as planned

The singer said he'll do as many planned interviews and performances from home as possible, but it's unclear what that means for his just-announced gig as Saturday Night Live musical guest on Nov. 6.

Los Angeles International Airport and SoFi Stadium employers spoke with potential job applicants at a job fair in Inglewood, Calif., in September. About 19% of all households in an NPR poll say they lost all their savings during the COVID-19 outbreak, and have none to fall back on. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Black and Latino families continue to bear pandemic's great economic toll in U.S.

More than 55% of Black and Latino households reported facing serious financial problems in recent months, a new poll finds. And more than a quarter have depleted their savings.

Black and Latino families continue to bear pandemic's great economic toll in U.S.

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Courtesy of Sesame Workshop

50 years ago, The Electric Company used comedy to boost kids' reading skills

In October 1971, The Electric Company flipped a switch and hit the public TV airwaves, aimed at using sketch comedy and animated shorts to teach kids to read.

50 years ago, 'The Electric Company' used comedy to boost kids' reading skills

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Caltrans maintenance supervisor Matt Martin walks by a landslide covering Highway 70 in the Dixie Fire zone Sunday in Plumas County, Calif. Heavy rains blanketing Northern California created slide and flood hazards in land scorched during last summer's wildfires. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

A historic storm brings heavy rain, flooding and mudflows to Northern California

Flooding was reported across the San Francisco Bay Area while the National Weather Service's Sacramento office warned of "potentially historic rain."

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) logo is seen displayed on a smartphone in this photo illustration. A battle over taxes continues to brew as the IRS is seeking to obtain more bank account information, a move strongly opposed by Republicans and the lenders themselves. Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Does the IRS really want to spy on your bank account? The latest tax fight explained

The Biden administration hopes to help fund its agenda by cracking down on tax evasion, but its plan to require more bank information is drawing strong opposition from GOP lawmakers and banks.

Does the IRS really want to spy on your bank account? The latest tax fight, explained

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The Wright Flyer as depicted on the new "Sunrise in Ohio" license plate. Jessie Balmert/Cincinnati Enquirer/USA TODAY NETWORK via Reuters Co hide caption

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Jessie Balmert/Cincinnati Enquirer/USA TODAY NETWORK via Reuters Co

Ohio reverses course after its new license plates showed the Wright Flyer backwards

Ohio had to quickly revise its design after realizing the original showed a plane pushing a banner instead of pulling it. North Carolina, where the historic flight took place, weighed in, too.

In this frame taken from video people gather Monday during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan. Military forces arrested Sudan's acting prime minister and senior government officials Monday, disrupted internet access and blocked bridges in the capital Khartoum, the country's information ministry said, describing the actions as a coup. AP hide caption

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AP

Sudan's military has seized power and arrested the prime minister

Military forces arrested Sudan's acting prime minister and other senior officials in an apparent coup as the country was nearing a planned transition to a civilian leadership.

Nurses check on a patient in a Jonesboro, Ark., ICU in August when the delta variant sparked yet another surge of serious COVID-19 cases in the region. The pandemic has only added to a longstanding nursing shortage in the U.S., statistics show. Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. needs more nurses, but nursing schools don't have enough slots

Across the country, hospitals are desperate for RNs and specialty nurses. Yet, paradoxically, the nursing pipeline has slowed, with educators retiring or returning to clinical work themselves.

The U.S. needs more nurses, but nursing schools don't have enough slots

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Emissions rise from the Duke Energy Corp. coal-fired Asheville Power Plant in Arden, N.C., in 2018. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Greenhouse gas levels reached record highs in 2020, even with pandemic lockdowns

The U.N. meteorological agency says despite a decrease in emissions due to reduced economic activity during COVID-19, carbon dioxide and other warming gases continued to accumulate in the atmosphere.

A nurse draw a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine dose from a vial at the Cameron Grove Community Center in Bowie, Md., in late March. Moderna says study data supports use of a half-dose of the vaccine in children 6 to 11. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Moderna says new data supports its COVID vaccine for kids 6 to 11

Moderna says a study in kids 6 to 11 found two doses of the company's COVID-19 vaccine given 28 days apart produced a strong antibody response.

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