World News and International Headlines NPR world news, international art and culture, world business and financial markets, world economy, and global trends in health, science and technology. Subscribe to the World Story of the Day podcast and RSS feed.

NPRWorld

Many Stories, One World

A woman walks through the Oleksiivska station in Kharkiv, Ukraine. Thousands of residents have been sheltering in the city's subway stations, but the mayor says it's safe to emerge now that Russian forces are retreating. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

A man wearing a face mask stands on a bridge over an expressway in Beijing, Thursday, May 19, 2022. Parts of Beijing on Thursday halted daily mass testing that had been conducted over the past several weeks, but many testing sites remained busy due to requirements for a negative COVID test in the last 48 hours to enter some buildings in China's capital. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Russian Army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, pleaded guilty Wednesday to killing an unarmed Ukrainian man during the first days of Russia's invasion in Ukraine. His case is the first war crimes trial since Russia invaded Ukraine nearly three months ago. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Courtroom drama: Ukrainian widow confronts Russian who shot her husband

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099997267/1099997268" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boat captain Emosi Dawai looks at the super-yacht Amadea where it is docked at the Queens Wharf in Lautoka, Fiji, on April 13, 2022. The super-yacht that American authorities say is owned by a Russian oligarch previously sanctioned for alleged money laundering has been seized by law enforcement in Fiji, the U.S. Justice Department announced May 5. Leon Lord/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Leon Lord/AP

A drawing from the War Toys project and Brian McCarty's photo that interprets that image. War Toys and Brian McCarty hide caption

toggle caption
War Toys and Brian McCarty

A photographer uses toys to reflect children's experiences in war

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099419151/1099447884" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

From left, Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, U.S. President Joe Biden and Germany's Chancellor Olaf Scholz speak as NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, back, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listen during a NATO summit on Russia's invasion of Ukraine in Brussels on March 24, 2022. Henry Nicholls/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Henry Nicholls/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. President Joe Biden, second from right, meets with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, second from left, in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. adviser tries to talk Mexican president out of skipping Summit of the Americas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099935416/1099997320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ima hugs Shakira at a shelter provided by the Nigerians Diaspora Organization in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Adam Lach for NPR

They escaped the war in Ukraine. Then they faced fresh trouble in Poland

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099721940/1099919967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Russian serviceman patrols the destroyed part of the Ilyich Iron and Steel Works in Ukraine's port city of Mariupol on Wednesday. Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images

Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv on Wednesday. He went on trial in Ukraine for the killing of an unarmed civilian and pleaded guilty. It is the first time a member of the Russian military has been prosecuted for a war crime since Russia invaded Ukraine in February. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Efrem Lukatsky/AP

A TV screen shows a news report on North Korea's missile launch with file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at a train station in Seoul on May 4. North Korea launched a ballistic missile toward its eastern waters, South Korean and Japanese officials said, days Kim vowed to bolster his nuclear arsenal "at the fastest possible pace" and threatened to use them against rivals. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Jin-man/AP

North Korea may conduct a missile or nuclear test timed with Biden's visit to Asia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099874018/1099874019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Shishimarin pleaded guilty to killing an unarmed Ukrainian civilian. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Efrem Lukatsky/AP

A mother helps her malnourished son stand after he collapsed near their hut in the village of Lomoputh in northern Kenya on Thursday. A severe drought and spiking food prices are causing a humanitarian emergency in the Horn of Africa. Brian Inganga/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Inganga/AP

Hundreds of people gather near a U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane at the perimeter of the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 16, 2021. SIGAR, released its interim report Wednesday detailing why Afghanistan's government and military collapsed immediately after the U.S. withdrawal. Shekib Rahmani/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Shekib Rahmani/AP

The U.S. deal with the Taliban destroyed Afghans' military morale, a new report says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099688825/1099707526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ukrainian Col. Roman Kostenko stands in a redbrick farmhouse with a gaping hole in one of the walls. This is where Kostenko taught soldiers how to set explosives. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

A member of Ukraine's parliament now trains a recon and sabotage unit to fight Russia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099680629/1099680630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript