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A scene from Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures' action adventure "DUNE: PART TWO," a Warner Bros. Pictures release. Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

Mel Brooks' satirical Western Blazing Saddles got mixed reviews when it opened in February 1974, but it became the year's biggest box office hit. Above, Cleavon Little, left, as Sheriff Bart and Gene Wilder as the Waco Kid. Warner Bros./Getty Images hide caption

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Warner Bros./Getty Images

50 years ago, 'Blazing Saddles' broke wind — and box office expectations

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The four-part docuseries Where is Wendy Williams? is streaming on Lifetime. Calvin Gayle/Lifetime hide caption

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Calvin Gayle/Lifetime

Enzo Vogrincic as Numa in Society of the Snow, one of five films nominated for the Academy Award for Best International Feature. Quim Vives/Netflix hide caption

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Quim Vives/Netflix

Kiawentiio as Katara, Gordon Cormier as Aang and Ian Ousley as Sokka. Netlfix hide caption

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Netlfix

Cillian Murphy in Christopher Nolan's Oppenheimer. Melinda Sue Gordon/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Melinda Sue Gordon/Universal Pictures

Shane Gillis returned to host Saturday Night Live five years after he was fired from the show. Above, Gillis performs at the Stand Up For Heroes Benefit in November 2023 in New York City. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for Bob Woodruff Foundation hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for Bob Woodruff Foundation

An outpost of The Second City has opened in Brooklyn. Above, the Brooklyn Bridge and lower Manhattan skyline are pictured at sunset. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

The Second City, named for its Chicago location, opens an outpost in New York

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Eugénie (Juliette Binoche) and Dodin Bouffant (Benoît Magimel) in The Taste of Things. Stéphanie Branchu/IFC Films hide caption

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Stéphanie Branchu/IFC Films

Margaret Qualley and Geraldine Viswanathan in Drive Away Dolls. Working Title / Focus Features hide caption

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Working Title / Focus Features

"We have to live with the monsters we create," Justine Triet told NPR's Scott Simon, when he asked whether characters linger with her after a film. "I've been living with these people for three years, and I think I'll probably live with them for at least another year." Les Films Pelléas hide caption

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Les Films Pelléas
John M Lund Photography Inc/Getty Images

Jennifer Lopez in This Is Me...Now: A Love Story. Courtesy of Prime hide caption

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Courtesy of Prime

Jada Pinkett Smith's creative life. Matt Winkelmeyer/Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images

Dakota Johnson in Madame Web. Columbia Pictures hide caption

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Columbia Pictures

An Apple TV+ animated special shows how Franklin, the first Black Peanuts character, meets Charlie Brown and friends in Snoopy Presents: Welcome Home, Franklin. Apple TV+ hide caption

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Apple TV+

The first Black 'Peanuts' character finally gets his origin story in animated special

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Kali Reis in True Detective: Night Country. Michele K. Short/HBO hide caption

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Michele K. Short/HBO

My first thought after watching two episodes of Couple to Throuple was: "This seems like a relationship structure perfect for people who like to attend a lot of meetings." Above, Denyse, left, Wilder, and Corey in the "Communication" episode. Paul Castillero/Peacock hide caption

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Paul Castillero/Peacock