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Joel Breman trains scientists in malaria diagnosis in Côte d'Ivoire, 1986. Breman died this month at age 87. Courtesy of the Breman family. hide caption

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Courtesy of the Breman family.

Surgeon Christoph Haller and his research team from Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children are working on technology that could someday result in an artificial womb to help extremely premature babies. Chloe Ellingson for NPR hide caption

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Chloe Ellingson for NPR

An artificial womb could build a bridge to health for premature babies

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Following a new EPA rule, public water systems will have five years to address instances where there is too much PFAS in tap water – three years to sample their systems and establish the existing levels of PFAS, and an additional two years to install water treatment technologies if their levels are too high. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In this photo illustration, a pack of Lunchables is displayed on Wednesday in San Anselmo, Calif. Consumer Reports is asking for the Department of Agriculture to eliminate Lunchables food kits from the National School Lunch Program after finding high levels of lead, sodium and cadmium in tested kits. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

While not an official holiday, National Siblings Day on April 10 has gained momentum on social media in recent years. Diana Haronis/Getty Images hide caption

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Diana Haronis/Getty Images

National Siblings Day is a celebration born of love — and grief

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

The order your siblings were born in may play a role in identity and sexuality

It's National Siblings Day! To mark the occasion, guest host Selena Simmons-Duffin is exploring a detail very personal to her: How the number of older brothers a person has can influence their sexuality. Scientific research on sexuality has a dark history, with long-lasting harmful effects on queer communities. Much of the early research has also been debunked over time. But not this "fraternal birth order effect." The fact that a person's likelihood of being gay increases with each older brother has been found all over the world – from Turkey to North America, Brazil, the Netherlands and beyond. Today, Selena gets into all the details: What this effect is, how it's been studied and what it can (and can't) explain about sexuality.

The order your siblings were born in may play a role in identity and sexuality

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A two-spot octopus, like the type an Oklahoma family brought home as a pet. Angelina Komatovich hide caption

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Angelina Komatovich

Terrance the octopus came to live with a family. Then she laid dozens of eggs

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The University of Edinburgh says Nobel prize-winning physicist Peter Higgs, who proposed the existence of the Higgs boson particle, has died at 94. Sean Dempsey/AP hide caption

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Sean Dempsey/AP

A new lunar time zone has been pitched for the moon. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

NASA has been asked to create a time zone for the moon. Here's how it would work

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Lily Padula for NPR

In the womb, a brother's hormones can shape a sister's future

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A long exposure photo of Firefly petunias, which are genetically modified to produce their own light through bioluminescence Sasa Woodruff/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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Sasa Woodruff/Boise State Public Radio

Watch your garden glow with new genetically modified bioluminescent petunias

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Amos Yew, right, uses a lens on an iPhone to record video in the first stages of the total solar eclipse Monday August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

A woman puts on special glasses to see the eclipse on Monday in Mazatlán, Mexico. Many people have flocked to the seaside area to catch a glimpse of the total solar eclipse. Hector Vivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Mexico's beach party is excited to see the eclipse first emerge

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TOPSHOT - Shadows form on the ground as the moon moves in front of the sun in a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse in Singapore on December 26, 2019. LOUIS KWOK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LOUIS KWOK/AFP via Getty Images

Student loan proposal targets accrued interest; Israel and Hamas war hits six months

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Yu Darvish #11 of the San Diego Padres throws a pitch during the third inning against the St. Louis Cardinals at Petco Park on April 2, 2024 in San Diego, California. Brandon Sloter/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Sloter/Getty Images

How climate change and physics affect baseball, America's favorite pastime

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