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An ant is host of the parasitic Ophiocordyceps fungus. Katja Schulz/Flickr hide caption

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Katja Schulz/Flickr

The zombies living in our midst

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"This parasite detaches the fish's tongue, attaches itself to the fish's mouth, and becomes its tongue," the Galveston Island State Park says, describing the parasitic tongue-eating louse. Galveston Island State Park hide caption

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Galveston Island State Park

Former science teacher Berna Gómez played a pivotal role in new research on restoring some sight to blind people. She is named as a co-author of the study that was published this week. Moran Eye Center, the University of Utah hide caption

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Moran Eye Center, the University of Utah

Scott Baisley holds his son Sullivan, who was delivered shortly before his mother died of COVID-19. Victoria Hansen/South Carolina Public Radio hide caption

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Victoria Hansen/South Carolina Public Radio

Despite higher COVID risk, most pregnant Americans remain unvaccinated

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Wellesley high schooler Andrew Song plays baritone sax in the jazz band. Craig LeMoult/GBH hide caption

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Craig LeMoult/GBH

With safety in mind, schools are getting their bands back together

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Lockdowns have been eased in the United Kingdom, but now there's a new variant called delta plus emerging. Will it take off the way delta did? Justin Setterfield/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Setterfield/Getty Images

People wonder if they should keep calm and carry on in the face of delta plus variant

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A young Native American woman sits in a museum display case alongside artifacts and human remains. Gabriella Trujillo for NPR hide caption

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Gabriella Trujillo for NPR

Code Switch: Archeological skeletons in the closet

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Menari, the critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, is seen climbing in her enclosure at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans. The zoo announced Thursday that Menari is pregnant with twins. Susan Poag/Digital Roux Photography hide caption

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Susan Poag/Digital Roux Photography

Canada, Newfoundland, L'anse Aux Meadows Nhp, Replicas Of Norse Houses From 1000 Years Ago. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR
Jeremy Monroe/Freshwater Illustrated

The Schuylkill River floods Philadelphia in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida in September. The extreme rain caught many by surprise, trapping people in basements and cars and killing dozens. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Safeway pharmacist Ashley McGee fills a syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 booster vaccination at a vaccination booster shot clinic on Oct. 1, in San Rafael, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In this September 2021 photo provided by NYU Langone Health, a surgical team at the hospital in New York examines a pig kidney attached to the body of a deceased recipient for any signs of rejection. The test was a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Joe Carrotta/AP hide caption

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Joe Carrotta/AP
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California's farmers are pumping billions of tons of extra water from underground aquifers this year because of the drought. But new restrictions on such pumping are coming into force. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Satellites reveal the secrets of water-guzzling farms in California

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How do our brains create meaning from the sounds around us? That is the question at the heart of a new book from neuroscientist Nina Kraus, called Of Sound Mind. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

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How do we make sense of the sounds around us?

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A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Lucy spacecraft lifts off from Launch Complex 41 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station on Saturday in Cape Canaveral, Fla. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP