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Conde Nast strike and Aaron Bushnell protest sign. ANGELA WEISS/AFP; Jacek Boczarski/Anadolu/Getty Images hide caption

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ANGELA WEISS/AFP; Jacek Boczarski/Anadolu/Getty Images

Three ways to think about journalism layoffs; plus, Aaron Bushnell's self-immolation

The American journalism industry is in crisis - layoffs, strikes, and site shutdowns have some people talking about the potential extinction of the the news industry as we know it. Just last week, VICE Media announced their plans to layoff hundreds of employees and halt website operations. Taylor Lorenz, the Washington Post online culture and technology columnist, joins the show to unpack what is at stake with the continued media closures and layoffs.

Three ways to think about journalism layoffs; plus, Aaron Bushnell's self-immolation

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Oprah Winfrey, pictured in January, said she will donate her stake in WeightWatchers and proceeds from any future stock options to the National Museum of African American History and Culture upon her departure from the company's board of directors. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

From left, Elon Musk, Sam Altman and Andrew Ross Sorkin, New York Times financial columnist, speak during the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on Oct. 6, 2015, in San Francisco. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

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Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

A prescription is filled on Jan. 6, 2023, in Morganton, N.C. A ransomware attack is disrupting pharmacies and hospitals nationwide this week. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Rohit Chopra, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is working toward regulation to remove medical bills from consumer credit reports. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

Why a financial regulator is going after health care debt

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The Israeli Minister of Finance reacts to the financial ratings agency Moody's decision to downgrade Israel's credit rating in March 2023. Maya Alerruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alerruzzo/AP

Two of the main characters from the 2015 game Life is Strange, Max Caulfield and Chloe Price. Dontnod Entertainment hide caption

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Dontnod Entertainment

A growing number of gamers are LGBTQ+, so why is representation still lacking?

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Thin Mints and Samoas are perennial bestselling Girl Scout Cookies, but Adventurefuls, Lemon-ups and Do-si-Do cookies also have die-hard fans. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

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Bill Chappell/NPR

Passengers wait in line at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in 2021 in Virginia. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Transportation Department proposes new rules for how airlines handle wheelchairs

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The Family Dollar logo is centered above one of its variety stores in Canton, Miss., Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020. More than 1,000 rodents were found inside a Family Dollar distribution facility in Arkansas, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Friday, Feb. 18, 2022 as the chain issued a voluntary recall affecting items purchased from hundreds of stores in the South. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

LEFT: Maria Lares is a longtime teacher and PTA Treasurer at Villacorta Elementary in La Puente, CA. RIGHT: Sophia Fabela (left) and Samantha Nicole Tan (right) are two students at Villacorta who consider themselves pretty good sales kids. Sarah Gonzalez/NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/NPR

The secret world behind school fundraisers and turning kids into salespeople

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A home available for sale is shown in Austin, Texas, on Oct. 16, 2023. Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers argues the consumer price index may understate the pain of rising interest rates, such as higher mortgages. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Workers and an unpainted Boeing 737 Max aircraft are pictured as the company's factory teams held a "Quality Stand Down" for the 737 program at Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash. on January 25, 2024. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The FAA gives Boeing 90 days to fix quality control issues. Critics say they run deep

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The Jeep logo is seen in the south Denver suburb of Englewood, Colo., on April 15, 2018. Chrysler is recalling more than 330,00 Jeep Grand Cherokees because of a steering wheel issue that may cause drivers to lose control of their vehicles. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

A sign is posted in front of a Wendy's restaurant on Aug. 10, 2022, in Petaluma, Calif. The company said Tuesday that it's planning to experiment with dynamic pricing. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

No, Wendy's says it isn't planning to introduce surge pricing

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