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A sign hangs above a Hertz rental car office on Aug. 4, 2020, in Chicago. The company said it's buying 100,000 Teslas in a bold move to diversify into electric vehicles. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chris Smalls, who runs the self-organized worker group Amazon Labor Union, has been gathering signatures from Amazon warehouse workers on Staten Island in support of a union election. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A nurse draw a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine dose from a vial at the Cameron Grove Community Center in Bowie, Md., in late March. Moderna says study data supports use of a half-dose of the vaccine in children 6 to 11. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Yaël Eisenstat, pictured in September, says Facebook leaders have known about problems with disinformation and how Facebook incentivizes the most extreme voices. Riccardo Savi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit hide caption

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Riccardo Savi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

Ex-Facebook employee says company has known about disinformation problem for years

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A battle over taxes continues to brew as the IRS is seeking to obtain more bank account information, a move strongly opposed by Republicans and the lenders themselves. Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Does the IRS really want to spy on your bank account? The latest tax fight, explained

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Nurses check on a patient in a Jonesboro, Ark., ICU in August when the delta variant sparked yet another surge of serious COVID-19 cases in the region. The pandemic has only added to a longstanding nursing shortage in the U.S., statistics show. Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. needs more nurses, but nursing schools don't have enough slots

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At a meeting in Concord, New Hampshire, on Oct. 13, 2021, audience members voice opposition to federal vaccine mandates. Some employers, from state governments to hospitals to private companies, have already begun enforcing their own vaccine mandates, leading to the resignation or firing of a small percentage of workers. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Holly Ramer/AP

Thousands of workers are opting to get fired, rather than take the vaccine

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Facebook lacked enough local language moderators to stop misinformation that at times led to real-world violence, according to leaked documents obtained by The Associated Press. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

President Biden promotes his Build Back Better Agenda, highlighting the importance of investing in child care, during a speech at the Capitol Child Development Center in Hartford, Conn., on Oct. 15. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Cars that are part of the Lyft ride-hailing fleet sit in a lot in Denver on April 30, 2020. The company says more than 1,800 sexual assaults were reported by riders in 2019, and the number of incidents has been rising sharply in recent years. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

A protester unleashes a smoke grenade in front of the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How the 'Stop the Steal' movement outwitted Facebook ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection

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Two Indicators: Congressional game theory and the debt ceiling

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Walmart is recalling about 3,900 bottles of Better Homes and Gardens-branded Essential Oil Infused Aromatherapy Room Spray with Gemstones in six different scents due to the possibility of a rare and dangerous bacteria discovered. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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Consumer Product Safety Commission
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Indicators of the Week: IPOs, ETFs, GHGs

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A 'Help Wanted' sign is posted beside Coronavirus safety guidelines in front of a restaurant in Los Angeles, California on May 28, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

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Pharmacist LaChandra McGowan prepares a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic operated by DePaul Community Health in New Orleans in August. Soon, children ages 5 to 11 could be eligible for Pfizer shots. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Los Angeles home featured in Wes Craven's 1984 A Nightmare on Elm Street is for sale for $3.5 million. Anthony Barcelo hide caption

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Anthony Barcelo

The house from the movie 'A Nightmare on Elm Street' is up for sale

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