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Pro-abortion rights demonstrators march in Washington, D.C., on May 14. While most U.S. adults favor some restrictions on abortion, according to our new poll, most also say they do not support overturning Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Poll: Two-thirds say don't overturn Roe; the court leak is firing up Democratic voters

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A woman shops for baby formula in Annapolis, Md., on May 16. Only a handful of companies supply baby formula in the country, a factor that has contributed to the current shortages being experienced in parts of the country. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

How the U.S. got into this baby formula mess

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Symptoms of the monkeypox virus are shown on a patient's hand, from a 2003 case in the United States. In most instances, the disease causes fever and painful, pus-filled blisters. New cases in the United Kingdom, Spain and Portugal are spreading possibly through sexual contact, which had not previously been linked to monkeypox transmission. CDC/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC/Getty Images

Dr. Denis Mukwege is a gynecologist, Nobel Peace Prize winner and advocate against sexual violence in conflict zones like his homeland, the Democratic Republic of Congo. He is now speaking out against the reports of rapes committed by Russian soldiers during the war in Ukraine. Fabian Sommer/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabian Sommer/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Urvashi Vaid, then-executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, protests at then-President George H.W. Bush's address on AIDS in March 1990 in Arlington, Virginia. The pioneering LGBTQ activist and attorney died last week at age 63. Dennis Cook/Associated Press hide caption

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Dennis Cook/Associated Press

A portrait of American statesman, writer and scientist Benjamin Franklin, circa 1750. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Benjamin Franklin gave instructions on at-home abortions in a book in the 1700s

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Tony Johnson sits on his bed with his dog, Dash, in the one-room home he shares with his wife, Karen Johnson, in a care facility in Burlington, Wash. on April 13, 2022. Johnson was one of the first people to get COVID-19 in Washington state in April of 2020. His left leg had to be amputated due to lack of wound care after he developed blood clots in his feet while on a ventilator. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

Tampon and Calendar Carol Yepes/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol Yepes/Getty Images

Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?

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Financial Times

Tracking 1 million COVID deaths

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Luke Medina

Michael Lee Cyrus, 72: Andy Williams' 'Love is a Many-Splendored Thing'

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Luke Medina

Elfriede Liselotte Matza Froisland, 93: Dolly Parton's 'Dumb Blonde'

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Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Gary Kazanjian/AP

Flags at the base of the Washington Monument fly at half staff to mark one 1 million deaths attributed to COVID-19. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Many Of America's One Million COVID Deaths Were Preventable?

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Nurse educator Katie Demelis and nurse manager Nydia White wrap the the body of a patient who died of COVID-19 at Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., on April 15, 2020. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images