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A resident carries her groceries at a supermarket in Beijing, on Friday. Residents of China's capital were emptying supermarket shelves and overwhelming delivery apps as the city government ordered accelerated construction of COVID-19 quarantine centers and field hospitals. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Various signs are posted outside the emergency room entrance on Nov. 1 at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange. Orange County's health officer has declared a local health emergency in response to increases in respiratory illnesses and an onslaught of the quickly spreading RSV, a respiratory virus that is most dangerous in young children. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

A Triple Serving Of Flu, COVID And RSV Hits Hospitals Ahead Of Thanksgiving

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A small group, including Stephanie Batchelor, left, sits on the steps of the Georgia state Capitol protesting the overturning of Roe v. Wade on June 26, 2022. The Georgia Supreme Court on Wednesday, Nov. 23, reinstated the state's ban on abortions after roughly six weeks of pregnancy. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

Workers wear protective gear in a Beijing neighborhood placed under lockdown in November. China had raised hopes by slightly relaxing its zero-COVID policy, but cities have been contending with a surge in cases. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

American Medical Association President Dr. Jack Resneck recently recounted how doctors around the country are facing difficulties practicing medicine in states that ban abortion. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Doctors who want to defy abortion laws say it's too risky

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DrAfter123/Getty Images; Katherine Sheehan; JJ Geiger; Photo Illustration by Kaz Fantone/NPR

'The Long COVID Survival Guide' to finding care and community

According to the CDC, out of all the American adults who have had COVID — and that's a lot of us — one in five went on to develop long COVID symptoms. While so many are struggling with this new disease, it can be hard for people to know how to take care of themselves.

'The Long COVID Survival Guide' to finding care and community

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From left: 1) Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a human cell infected with H3N2 flu virus (gold filamentous particles). 2) Scanning electron micrograph of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) virions (colorized blue) that are shedding from the surface of human lung epithelial cells. 3) Transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron virus particles (gold). Science Source/ NIAID hide caption

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Science Source/ NIAID

Experts are concerned Thanksgiving gatherings could accelerate a 'tripledemic'

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Exhibit creator Susannah Perlman poses in front of the "tiny home" on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

An art exhibit on the National Mall honors health care workers who died of COVID

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Republican state Supreme Court Justice Sharon Kennedy speaks to supporters at an election watch party at the Renaissance Hotel on Nov. 8, in Columbus, Ohio. Kennedy was reelected to the court, this time as its chief justice. Andrew Spear/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Spear/Getty Images

How GOP state supreme court wins could change state policies and who runs Congress

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States differ on how best to spend $26B from settlement in opioid cases

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A worker walks past lines of solar panels at the Roha Dyechem solar project in the western northwest Indian state of Rajasthan. Money Sharma/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Money Sharma/AFP via Getty Images

'Sunny Makes Money': India installs a record volume of solar power in 2022

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Simon & Schuster

A cell biologist shares the wonder of researching life's most fundamental form

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DrAfter123/Getty Images

Want to get better at being thankful? Here are some tips

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Eric Minikel and Sonia Vallabh pivoted from careers in law and urban planning to lead a prion research lab at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Maria Nemchuk/Broad Institute hide caption

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Maria Nemchuk/Broad Institute

Antonio Rapuano got an infusion of a monoclonal antibody to treat his COVID in Albano, Italy in 2021. Such infusions have been effective treatments for COVID during the pandemic, but doctors are now finding that most monoclonal antibodies no longer work against new variants of SARS-CoV-2. Yara Nardi/Reuters hide caption

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Yara Nardi/Reuters

How monoclonal antibodies lost the fight with new COVID variants

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Chima Williams, an attorney in Nigeria, is one of the winners of this year's Goldman Environmental Prize. He sued Shell over oil spills in his country. Speaking of his activism, Williams notes: "There is power in what you believe and how you go about it uncompromisingly." KC Nwakalor for NPR hide caption

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KC Nwakalor for NPR

He started protesting about his middle school principal. Now he's taking on Big Oil

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Cinde Lucas, whose husband Rick has suffered from long COVID, examines the many supplements and prescription medications he tried while looking for something to combat brain fog, depression and fatigue. Blake Farmer/ WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/ WPLN

Long-COVID clinics are wrestling with how to treat their patients

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