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Los Angeles International Airport and SoFi Stadium employers spoke with potential job applicants at a job fair in Inglewood, Calif., in September. About 19% of all households in an NPR poll say they lost all their savings during the COVID-19 outbreak, and have none to fall back on. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Black and Latino families continue to bear pandemic's great economic toll in U.S.

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UNDATED: Chicago Bulls' forward Michael Jordan #23 dunks as the crowd takes photos during a game against the Portland Trail Blazers circa 1984-1998. (Photo by Focus on Sport via Getty Images) Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport via Getty Images hide caption

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Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport via Getty Images

Ed Sheeran, pictured in 2018 at the Berlin International Film Festival, says he has tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19 just days ahead of the release of his fourth album. Thomas Niedermueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Niedermueller/Getty Images

A fisherman sails with his son in an outrigger. They live in a village on the Willaumez Peninsula on New Britain Island, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. David Doubilet hide caption

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David Doubilet

Candles surround a photo of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during a vigil on Oct. 23 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The American Film Institute established a scholarship in honor of Hutchins, who was killed by a prop gun on the set of the movie "Rust" last week. Sam Wasson/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Wasson/Getty Images

A sign hangs above a Hertz rental car office on Aug. 4, 2020, in Chicago. The company said it's buying 100,000 Teslas in a bold move to diversify into electric vehicles. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chris Smalls, who runs the self-organized worker group Amazon Labor Union, has been gathering signatures from Amazon warehouse workers on Staten Island in support of a union election. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A nurse draw a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine dose from a vial at the Cameron Grove Community Center in Bowie, Md., in late March. Moderna says study data supports use of a half-dose of the vaccine in children 6 to 11. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Martha Lillard needed a large respirator called an iron lung to recover from polio, which she caught in 1953. She still uses a form of the device at nights. Courtesy of Martha Lillard hide caption

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Courtesy of Martha Lillard

Unvaccinated people who arrive in China for the Beijing Olympcs will face isolation in a mandatory three-week quarantine. Here, a room is seen in the athletes village in Zhangjiakou, China. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

Emissions rise from Duke Energy's coal-fired Asheville power plant in Arden, N.C., in 2018. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Hate on trial in Virginia, four years after deadly extremist rally

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A battle over taxes continues to brew as the IRS is seeking to obtain more bank account information, a move strongly opposed by Republicans and the lenders themselves. Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Does the IRS really want to spy on your bank account? The latest tax fight, explained

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