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In this Nov. 22, 1963, file photo, seen through the foreground convertible's windshield, President John F. Kennedy's hand reaches toward his head within seconds of being fatally shot. About 90% of the government records surrounding the assassination have been released but the release of the remaining records have now been delayed. James W. (Ike) Altgens/AP hide caption

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James W. (Ike) Altgens/AP

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., and Rep. Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif., emerge victorious in the fourth Anheuser-Busch Brew Across America Congressional Brewing Competition in Washington, D.C. Sean McFarland/LP Creative Studio hide caption

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Sean McFarland/LP Creative Studio

There's bipartisan cooperation brewing on Capitol Hill ... over beer

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Court observers suspect it is only a matter of time before a conservative majority on the Supreme Court, explicitly or implicitly, strikes down Roe v. Wade and other abortion precedents of the last half century. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court keeps Texas abortion law in place, but agrees to review it

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Voting rights activist Stacey Abrams speaks during an Oct. 17 rally in Norfolk supporting Terry McAuliffe in his bid to reclaim the Virginia governor's office. To drum up enthusiasm, Democrats have brought in some of their biggest names. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Democratic coalition will be tested in the Virginia governor's race

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Tablets believed to be laced with fentanyl are displayed at a Drug Enforcement Administration lab in New York in 2019. The Biden administration is hoping to crack down on abuse of synthetic opioids in part by putting them in the most restricted category or "schedule" under the law. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

A proposed Biden drug policy could widen racial disparities, civil rights groups warn

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Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.V., leaves a meeting in Arizona Democrat Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's office at the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 21. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Watkins is vice chair of the school board of Gwinnett County, a suburban county north of Atlanta. She is surprised that she has become a target for a political culture war. "I just didn't realize that it would impact the local school board," Watkins says. "Our main focus is towards student achievement and ensuring that we are producing children that are thriving." Johnathon Kelso for NPR hide caption

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Johnathon Kelso for NPR

What it's like to be on the front lines of the school board culture war

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A major gathering of anti-vaccine activists will take place this weekend at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn. While the hotel, seen here, encourages guests to wear masks, they are not mandatory. Andrew Woodley/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Andrew Woodley/Education Images/Universal Image

While COVID still rages, anti-vaccine activists will gather for a big conference

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Attorney General Merrick Garland told the House Judiciary Committee that "the Department of Justice has a long-standing policy of not commenting on investigations." Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced plans to launch his own social networking platform called TRUTH Social, which is expected to begin its beta launch for "invited guests" next month. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Ted Budd speaks on June 5 at a GOP event after former President Donald Trump had just endorsed him for North Carolina's open U.S. Senate seat. The endorsement has shaped the early contours of the primary. Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump shapes North Carolina's Republican Senate primary with an early endorsement

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., led opposition among Republicans to a voting rights bill that centrist Democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia hoped to corrall GOP votes for. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Safeway pharmacist Ashley McGee fills a syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 booster vaccination at a vaccination booster shot clinic on Oct. 1, in San Rafael, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A campaign sign for a slate of candidates challenging three incumbent board members in Centerville, Ohio. If they win, they would control the five member board. It is a non-partisan position, but national political hot buttons have infused the race. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Tamara Keith/NPR

School board elections will be an early test of what issues motivate voters

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The original price tag for the plan that President Biden refers to as "human infrastructure" was $3.5 trillion. But moderates want that trimmed down to $1.5 trillion, a number that progressives consider too low. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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