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President Biden walks with Jason Owens, chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, in Brownsville, Texas, on Feb. 29. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 14. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Supreme Court to hear arguments in Trump immunity case in April

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will step down as Republican leader in November. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Mitch McConnell will step down as Senate minority leader in November

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Hunter Biden appeared for a closed-door deposition in the GOP impeachment inquiry into his father, President Joe Biden. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

After months-long battle with GOP, Hunter Biden appears for impeachment testimony

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President Biden walks out of the White House on Wednesday to board Marine One for a short trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., for his annual physical. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Biden just got a physical. But a cognitive test was not part of the assessment

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A Democratic voter uncommitted to President Biden rallies outside of a polling location at Maples Elementary School on Feb. 27 in Dearborn, Mich. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Republican Arizona Senate candidate Kari Lake speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Saturday, Feb. 24. Lake has softened her stance on abortion as the campaign season moves forward. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Arizona, abortion politics are already playing out on the Senate campaign trail

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A giant cross next to a small church in Vance, Alabama. The state is among those where views supporting Christian nationalism are the strongest in the country, according to a new survey. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden and Vice President Harris met with House Speaker Mike Johnson and other top congressional leaders in the Oval Office on Tuesday to discuss government funding and Ukraine aid. Roberto Schmidt/Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/Getty Images

Congressional leaders hope to avoid a shutdown. But Ukraine aid is still unclear

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State Representative Abraham Aiyash speaks at a "Vote Uncommitted" rally on Feb. 25, 2024 in Hamtramck, Mich. Sylvia Jarrus for NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Jarrus for NPR

On primary day, young Michigan voters are leading call to be 'uncommitted' to Biden

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Alabama Supreme Court Justice Tom Parker speaks on the steps of the state judicial building on April 5, 2006, in Montgomery, Ala. Jamie Martin/AP hide caption

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Jamie Martin/AP

Alabama justice's ties with far-right Christian movement raise concern

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The U.S. Supreme Court Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Supreme Court justices appear skeptical of Texas and Florida social media laws

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Republican presidential candidate former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley speaking at an election night event, Saturday, Feb. 24, in Charleston, S.C. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at a primary election night party at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds in Columbia, S.C., on Saturday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Republican presidential candidate former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley talks to the media after voting Saturday in Kiawah Island, S.C. Haley called former President Donald Trump's comments about Black voters "disgusting." Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

"It's a great day in South Carolina when I can come home," Nikki Haley delivered her signature line with a hometown twist to supporters. Republican presidential candidate and former UN Ambassador Haley steps off of her campaign bus ahead of an event on Feb. 13 in her hometown of Bamberg, S.C. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

They say you can't go home again. Nikki Haley can but it doesn't guarantee votes

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