Politics NPR's expanded coverage of U.S. and world politics, the latest news from Congress and the White House, and elections.

PoliticsPolitics

Republican state Supreme Court Justice Sharon Kennedy speaks to supporters at an election watch party at the Renaissance Hotel on Nov. 8, in Columbus, Ohio. Kennedy was reelected to the court, this time as its chief justice. Andrew Spear/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Spear/Getty Images

How GOP state supreme court wins could change state policies and who runs Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138344117/1138728417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Republican Monica De La Cruz-Hernandez flipped the 15th House Congressional District in one of Texas' only remaining competitive districts. In this file photo, she talks in her office in Alamo, Texas, July 8, 2021. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

J. Edgar Hoover is seen in his Washington, D.C., office in 1936. A new biography of the long-time FBI director looks at public support for his policies during most of his tenure. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Biography traces public support for J. Edgar Hoover in most of his 48 years in power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138189651/1138555877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chef Robert Irvine and Lance Cpl. Oscar Aguilar, with food services, 2nd Landing Support Battalion, prepare mashed potatoes for Friendsgiving dinner aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., on Nov. 21, 2022. Staff Sgt. Mark Morrow/Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point hide caption

toggle caption
Staff Sgt. Mark Morrow/Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point

The two national Thanksgiving turkeys, Chocolate and Chip, are photographed before a pardoning ceremony at the White House on Monday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Biden pardoned the Thanksgiving turkeys. Read the strange truth behind the tradition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/782716688/783069776" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos Jr., right, welcomes Vice President Harris to Malacanang Palace in Manila on Nov. 21, 2022. Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images

On Wednesday in Atlanta, Gabriel Sterling, chief operating officer for the Georgia secretary of state, rolls a 10-sided die as part of process to determine which batches of ballots to audit for a statewide risk limiting audit of the 2022 general election. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Gray/AP

Georgia election officials breathe a sigh of relief after uneventful voting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137746823/1138411521" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden, campaigning with gubernatorial candidate Wes Moore in Bowie, Maryland, on the eve of the U.S. midterm election. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Jim Marchant, center, GOP nominee for secretary of state in Nevada, lost his election and also underperformed fellow Republicans running for U.S. senator and governor. John Locher/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Locher/AP

Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacy Abrams lost the election this year by a larger margin than she did 4 years ago, leading to questions about the future of the party in the state. Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Associated Press

Georgia Democrats weigh what's next after losing race for governor again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137552158/1138299876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Former DOJ Prosecutor Jack Smith at the Kosovo Specialist Chambers court in The Hague, Netherlands, Nov. 9, 2020. Attorney General Merrick Garland named Smith a special counsel on Friday to oversee two investigations involving Donald Trump. Jerry Lampen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jerry Lampen/AP

Jack Smith, seen in 2010 when he was the Justice Department's chief of the Public Integrity Section. Attorney General Merrick Garland named Smith a special counsel on Friday to oversee DOJ's criminal investigations involving former President Donald Trump. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Dharapak/AP

DOJ names Jack Smith as special counsel to oversee Trump criminal investigations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137736663/1137969903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks with Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., during a news conference with House Democrats about the Build Back Better legislation, outside of the Capitol in 2021. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Rep. James Comer, R-Ky., is poised to take the gavel as Chairman of the House Oversight Committee if Republicans take control of the House in January. They are expected to hold a narrow majority and launch wide ranging probes of the Biden administration. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images