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White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

National Security

Hate on trial in Virginia, four years after deadly extremist rally

A violent march in Charlottesville by far-right extremists in 2017 showed how well organized the far-right had become. A trial targeting those associated with the march is seen as a bellwether case.

Introspection Stan Forebee
Expectations Stan Forebee
Synthesis The Album Leaf
Forever Drive The Album Leaf
Concept 1 Kodomo

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Hate on trial in Virginia, four years after deadly extremist rally

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Crystal Sky LRKR
Morning Rain LRKR

Artists paint a mural on a wall near Scottish Events Centre (SEC) in Glasgow, which will host the U.N. climate summit starting Sunday. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

The COP26 summit to fight climate change is about to start. Here's what to expect

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Waxin Emancipator
Electric Company Theme The Short Circus
The Electric Company End Credits (Season 5) The Electric Company

Yaël Eisenstat, pictured in September, says Facebook leaders have known about problems with disinformation and how Facebook incentivizes the most extreme voices. Riccardo Savi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit hide caption

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Riccardo Savi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

Ex-Facebook employee says company has known about disinformation problem for years

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New Mexico residents attend a candlelight vigil to honor cinematographer Halyna Hutchins in Albuquerque, N.M. Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021. Hutchins was fatally shot on Thursday on the set of a Western filmed in Santa Fe, N.M. Andres Leighton/AP hide caption

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Andres Leighton/AP

The fatal shooting of Halyna Hutchins is prompting calls to ban real guns from sets

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The Workers of Art The Cinematic Orchestra
Lessons The Cinematic Orchestra
My Father in Hong Kong 1961 Gold Panda
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Latitude (Remix) Nujabes feat. Five Deez

Voting rights activist Stacey Abrams speaks during an Oct. 17 rally in Norfolk supporting Terry McAuliffe in his bid to reclaim the Virginia governor's office. To drum up enthusiasm, Democrats have brought in some of their biggest names. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The Democratic coalition will be tested in the Virginia governor's race

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At a meeting in Concord, New Hampshire, on Oct. 13, 2021, audience members voice opposition to federal vaccine mandates. Some employers, from state governments to hospitals to private companies, have already begun enforcing their own vaccine mandates, leading to the resignation or firing of a small percentage of workers. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Holly Ramer/AP

Thousands of workers are opting to get fired, rather than take the vaccine

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Atoms Endless Dive
Lifthome Endless Dive
Ghosts The American Dollar
Acrobats The American Dollar
My First Car Vulfpeck

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