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Latin America

People take parte in a march organized by citizen organizations demanding that electoral autonomy be respected in the upcoming general elections in downtown Mexico City, Sunday, Feb. 18, 2024. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

Joyce Cecília, 27, member of the Brilhetes all-women bate-bola crew after the group's first carnival outing in Anchieta, Rio de Janeiro on February 09, 2023. María Magdalena Arréllaga for NPR hide caption

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María Magdalena Arréllaga for NPR

Women are breaking Brazil's 'bate-bola' Carnival mold

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Municipal Police inspect the underpass that is known to have drug consumption activity in Porto, Portugal on Monday, June 5, 2023. On a daily bases city municipal workers and officers of the Municipal Police walk the paths and areas used by drug consumers to remove used syringes to reduce injury and the spread of diseases such as HIV and Hepatitis. Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Portugal's Success Combating its Opioid Crisis

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Palestinians look at their neighbor's damaged house following an Israeli strike in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Saturday, Jan. 27, 2024. Fatima Shbair/AP hide caption

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Fatima Shbair/AP

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro gestures as he speaks on Dec. 3. Pedro Rances Mattey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Rances Mattey/AFP via Getty Images

Venezuela's leftist leader Maduro makes a play for evangelical voters

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Sebastián Piñera, former Chilean president, is pictured in Santiago on Nov. 16, 2017. Piñera died on Tuesday in a helicopter crash in Lago Ranco, Chile. Luis Hidalgo/AP hide caption

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Luis Hidalgo/AP

A 16-year-old boy who was captured and claimed to have been beaten by members of El Salvador's naval force in November 2022 in Usulután, a small town in eastern El Salvador. Carlos Barrera hide caption

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Carlos Barrera

Banner with the face of President Nayib Bukele on the roof of the pupusas restaurant of Arnulfo Crisostomo Mazariego in San Salvador on Jan. 29. Fred Ramos for NPR hide caption

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Fred Ramos for NPR

Why the 'world's coolest dictator' is on course for a landslide win in El Salvador

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Migrants walk towards a Border Patrol agent in the town of Jacumba. Those crossing the border are often being instructed by cartels to turn themselves over to agents, in order to receive asylum. Ash Ponders for NPR hide caption

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Ash Ponders for NPR

A California community sees a dip in immigration. Where have all the people gone?

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Is the series of snowy storms in North America making you a little ... um ... squirrely? Well imagine if this was the first time you ever saw snow in your life! We reached out to people in the Global South and other parts to share their stories of the first time they saw snow. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Soldiers enter the prison in Cotopaxi, Ecuador, on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2024. Soldiers and police intervened in several prisons in Ecuador in search of weapons, ammunition and explosives and to restore order. Dolores Ochoa/AP hide caption

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Dolores Ochoa/AP

Incoming Guatemalan President Bernardo Arévalo sings his nation's anthem at the start of his swearing-in ceremony in Guatemala City, early Monday, Jan. 15, 2024. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

A Pivotal Election in Taiwan and a Guatemala Inauguration that Almost Didn't Happen

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Incoming Guatemalan President Bernardo Arévalo takes the oath of office during his swearing-in ceremony in Guatemala City, early Monday, Jan. 15, 2024. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Rolando Alvarez, bishop of Matagalpa, gives a news conference regarding the Roman Catholic Church's agreeing to act as "mediator and witness" in a national dialogue between members of civil society and the government in Managua, Nicaragua, May 3, 2018. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP